Going mobile with ownCloud

ownCloud logo About two years ago, I gave ownCloud a look. ownCloud, if you don’t know it, is an Open Source alternative to file storage and syncing services like Dropbox, Box, SpiderOak, and Google Drive.

The key difference between ownCloud and other services is that you can host your own instance of ownCloud if you have your own web server (or use a hosting firm that has a good track record for security). There are also a number of providers of hosted services from whom you can get free plans or buy storage, as you can with the well-known storage services.

One reason people use services like Dropbox and Box is because they have very solid, very useful mobile apps. Then again, ownCloud does too. Let’s look at a couple of them.

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Getting your Android apps with F-Droid

F-Droid logo Android. That can be a divisive word in the FLOSS world. Some embrace it. Others shun it. Others still use more open versions of Android like Cyanogenmod and Replicant.

If you do use an Android device, there is one thing you need to get the most out of your Android-powered device: apps. Default way is to get install those apps is to use Google Play. But what happens if you want to keep your apps open and free? You turn to F-Droid.

Wondering what that is? Keep reading to find out.

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Managing your tasks with DoStuff

todo My preferred tool for managing tasks is a text file. Not just any text file, but todo.txt. OK, it’s more than a text tile. It’s also a powerful shell script that does the heavy lifting for you. What I like about todo.txt is that it’s simple and, because it’s plain text, it’s portable.

That said, there’s one aspect of todo.txt that puts some people off: it’s a command line tool. Yes, it’s true. There are Linux users who aren’t huge fans of the command line. Sure, there’s a solid graphical interface to todo.txt for Android devices. But what if someone wants to get the full todo.txt experience on your desktop without cracking open a terminal window?

They can turn to DoStuff. DoStuff is a plain, but nicely effective, graphical face for todo.txt.

Let’s take a look at it.

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Writing in Markdown with UberWriter

UberWriter logo I do a majority of my writing (and that includes all of my blogging) in Markdown. What’s Markdown? It’s what’s called a lightweight markup language and it allows me to write and format what I’m writing using keyboard symbols. You can learn more about Markdown here.

There are a number of reasons I use Markdown, but essentially it has to do with my love of working in plain text and the need for flow.

Over the years, I’ve used a number of online, desktop, and mobile editors to work with Markdown. Many of them had features that I liked but none really had everything I was looking for.

That was until I ran into UberWriter. For me, it’s almost the perfect Markdown editor. Read on to find out why.

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Listening to music on the Linux desktop with Clementine

turntable So much music, so many desktop music players, and so little time.

I’m sure that most Linux users can rattle off the names of a few music players. We’ve all tried a few (sometimes more than a few), in the hopes of finding the right one. I know I have. The closest I came to finding that music player was one called Songbird. Until it stopped working and the developers stopped showing the Linux version any love.

While I still haven’t found that music player that’s perfect for me, one that I stumbled across a while ago has made an impression. It’s called Clementine and while it’s simple, it does quite a good job.

Let’s take a look at it.

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Three journaling tools for the Linux desktop

journal No matter what your reasons are for keeping a journal or a diary, there are any number of ways in which to keep that journal. You could go old school and use a paper notebook. You could use a web-based applications. Or you could take advantage of the humble text file.

Another option is to use a dedicated journaling application. There are several very flexible and very useful journaling tools for the Linux desktop.

Let’s take a look at three of them.

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